Why the name “chat cards”??

playingWe chose chat-cards because card games are very “social”.  Games for fun often have lots of talking and laughing and swapping of stories during the games.  They also involve the people “reading” skills to help you find your opponent’s “tells” (actions that “tell” you whether he is bluffing or not!).

Some people say that card games are best played by liars — and if a person is really good at cards, then they must be a really good liar.  But that is not true.  It is not about the lies – it is about the ability not to get excited or smile or give other hints about your hand.  Think about when someone gave you $100 bill — chances are you smiled.  That is a “tell” — anyone watching you would know you were happy about something that just happened.  Or in the case of cards, you might be happy about what cards you are holding in your hands.

In Casino card games, there is less conversation between players, and almost none with the dealer … and the dealer is the “common enemy” of all the players!  The players are all banded together to beat the dealer, even though the players never share their secrets.

Because money is at stake in casino games, other players often play very seriously, and do not like it when “newbies” take actions that the “seasoned” player doesn’t agree with.  This can affect the game and cause players to jump tables.

Because of that, some refuse to play the table (card) games and prefer to stay on the video poker machines (including the online machines!).  Of course, you lose the social aspect, but you are still playing card games.

And online video poker machines can be played “for fun” — which means free!  Or you can play for real money.  The poker machines are also very good ways to learn the mechanics behind the card games such as pairs, flush, straight, etc., without having any pressure from anyone around you.

Besides the main casino card games, there are dozens of fun card games that you can play with friends and family as well!  No matter which you choose, always remember to have fun!

Bridge Deals Online to Learn From and Discuss

The Internet has had a profound effect on our lives, primarily for the better.

In bridge, there are websites and blogs everywhere. Exchanging interesting deals is easy. You can pose questions and await replies from players of all levels. You can discuss issues at, for example, bridgewinners.com. And Facebook contains […] Continue Reading…

Monaco Triumphs at Reisinger Board-a-Match Teams

The Reisinger Board-a-Match Teams, the premier event at the Fall North American Championships last month in Phoenix, was won by the defending champions, Team Monaco: Pierre Zimmermann, Franck Multon, Fulvio Fantoni, Claudio Nunes, Geir Helgemo and Tor Helness. They finished just over two boards ahead of Norberto Bocchi and […] Continue Reading…

The Lederer Memorial Trophy in London

All top players like to receive an invitation to the Lederer Memorial Trophy in London. It is a most enjoyable weekend, with a social atmosphere and top-level bridge.

This year the location was new: the elegant Royal Automobile Club.
There were 10 teams playing a round robin of 10-board matches. The […] Continue Reading…

Bridge Books for Declarers and Duplicate Players

Among the popular bridge books reprinted this year are two updated classics: “The Secrets of Winning Bridge,” by Jeff Rubens (Bridge World Books), and “Treasury of Bidding Tips,” by Eddie Kantar (Master Point Press).

The Rubens book is particularly useful for duplicate players. And Kantar has added some tips to […] Continue Reading…

Married Couple Win Loeb Cup Tournament

The annual Arthur L. Loeb Cup Bridge Tournament raises money for the Lenox Hill Neighborhood House on the Upper East Side of Manhattan. This year’s event, which attracted 200 players, including most of the top New York area experts, was held at the Neighborhood House on Oct. 8.

The pair […] Continue Reading…

A Computer Championship in Indonesia

How would you compare humans with computer programs when it comes to playing chess or bridge?

In chess the positions of the pieces are always known. It is a pure computational exercise. This explains why machines have done so well against even the top grandmasters.
In bridge, though, there is incomplete […] Continue Reading…